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Pat Adams

Works from the 1970s and 80s

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Over decades Pat Adams (American, b. 1928) has developed a complex abstract visual vocabulary to explore metaphysical ideas in both her large-scale paintings and intimate works on paper.

Since the mid-fifties, Adams has explored a core vocabulary of abstract geometric forms that have been embedded in undefined fields of glistening colors. Her imagery often includes circles, curves, lines, arabesques, squares, and variations of spherical shapes. She often enhances the material quality of her paintings by mixing sand, mica, eggshells and other natural materials into her pigments, creating both deep and shallow spaces; mysterious transparency and physicality.

Adams has developed her own language and system of poetics that has been revealed in her titles and writings to describe qualities in her work: “quiddity or whatness, richesse, the once again begin again, towardness, involuntary affect, slowing, apparency, delayed closure, autogenous bursts, and the ‘not-as-yet.’”

Adams’s drawings and paintings have been the subject of more than thirty one-person shows in New York since the mid-1950s. Since the early 1960s Adams has lived in Vermont, where she enjoyed a long teaching career at Bennington College.


Pat Adams Press
Press Release

Install Shot 02

Adams’s worldview, combined with an intense focus on visuality and an awareness of the psychology of perception—how we see, feel, and comprehend the world—has its origins during her childhood in California and was solidified in her years of study at the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to art, Adams studied anthropology, paleontology, psychology, and physics, which impressed her both on the complexity of the phenomenal world, and the significance of primary, intrinsic constructs in how we perceive and comprehend that world. After graduating Berkley in 1949, Adams moved to New York, where she began to study the painting of Kandinsky and Mondrian at the Guggenheim and the works of Jackson Pollock at the Museum of Modern Art. She attended classes at the Brooklyn Museum Art School where she studied with Max Beckmann, John Ferren and Reuben Tam.

“The metaphysical underpinnings of these dense and delicate pictures divulge themselves gradually. Adams illuminates what are often abstruse avenues of philosophical thought, yet doesn’t put a fine point on them. Her pictures are particular as they are elusive, and she thrives on paradox.”

Mario Naves

 

“One of the most startling things about Ms. Adams’s works is that their flat surfaces, as active, various and sometimes seemingly chaotic as they are, still maintain clockwork precision and clarity. It’s as if we were seeing the stages of growth or the steps of transformation, each accompanied by its gaseous residue or shed skin”

Lance Esplund

Out Come Out

Out Come Out, 1980, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, pastel, mica, eggshell and sand on linen, 80 x 80 inches

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While Adam’s paintings often have an immediate, even visceral impact on the viewer, their great strength may rest in their ability to draw viewers in and keep them visually, mentally, and emotionally engaged over long periods of looking, thinking and feeling. Her work has a unique core that confront the viewer, asking to give their exclusive attention to what is before their eyes, so that they focus more on the painting and not on the search for outside references. Her works ask the viewer to observe what happens when a wire-thin line journeys into an undefined field, or when jolts of color move in a parabolic trajectory across the canvas.

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Cardinal

Cardinal, 1978, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, and eggshell on canvas, 80 x 86 inches

“The overlapping transparent and semi-transparent layers, the multitude of abstract vocabularies engaging with each other in various ways, become an invitation to immerse oneself in the many different pleasures and possibilities that her paintings bring together. On every scale, Adams’s work invites a slow contemplative engagement, which runs counter to the quick visual consumption of a signature image or motif, which has become a commonplace experience in today’s art world.”

John Yau

 

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Interstitial, 1987, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, shell, mica, pigment on canvas, 80 x 131 1/2 inches

Apparent, 1982, acrylic over lithograph proof on paper, 25 1/2 x 18 inches

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Top and Bottom, 1971, oil, isobutyl methacrylate and mica on canvas, 77 x 24 inches

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Au Point, 1980, acrylic, mica and eggshell on paper, 17 3/4 x 23 inches

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Arise, 1981, acrylic, crayon and sand on paper, 23 x 18 3/4 inches

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Our Time, 1979, mixed media on paper, 21 1/4 x 29 inches

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Out Come Out, 1980, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, pastel, mica, eggshell and sand on linen, 80 x 80 inches

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Else, 1979, lithographic ink on macre Japanese paper, acrylic, eggshell, crayon and pastel on paper, 21 1/2 x 28 1/4 inches

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Noah’s Ark, 1979, acrylic, mica and ink on paper, 23 x 17 inches

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Calculus of Rhyme, 1987, acrylic, sand and pigment on paper, 18 7/8 x 16 1/2 inches

Cardinal, 1978, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, and eggshell on canvas, 80 x 86 inches

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In a Way of Sense, 1977, acrylic, mica, sand and crayon on paper, 19 x 11 1/2 inches

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Avec, 1979, mixed media on paper, 19 1/2 x 17 1/4 inches

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Willingness, 1977, acrylic, mother of pearl, pastel and Bic pen ink on paper, 16 1/2 x 15 inches

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Such That, 1987, mixed media on paper, 11 3/16 x 15 7/8 inches

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More So When, 1971, oil, isobutyl methacrylate and mica on linen, 68 x 68 inches

Tethered Ease, 1971, oil and isobutyl methacrylate on canvas, 70 x 72 inches

See What Happens, 1971, gouache on paper, 22 1/2 x 16 1/4 inches

Surface Climate, 1971, gouache and pastel on paper, 21 x 8 1/2 inches

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Glistening Drowse, 1970, gouache on paper, 17 1/2 x 15 1/2 inches

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How it Starts, 1974, gouache on paper, 17 x 19 3/4 inches

Errand of Honey, 1971, gouache on paper, 20 x 10 inches

Interstitial, 1987, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, shell, mica, pigment on canvas, 80 x 131 1/2 inches

Apparent, 1982, acrylic over lithograph proof on paper, 25 1/2 x 18 inches

Top and Bottom, 1971, oil, isobutyl methacrylate and mica on canvas, 77 x 24 inches

Au Point, 1980, acrylic, mica and eggshell on paper, 17 3/4 x 23 inches

Arise, 1981, acrylic, crayon and sand on paper, 23 x 18 3/4 inches

Our Time, 1979, mixed media on paper, 21 1/4 x 29 inches

Out Come Out, 1980, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, pastel, mica, eggshell and sand on linen, 80 x 80 inches

Else, 1979, lithographic ink on macre Japanese paper, acrylic, eggshell, crayon and pastel on paper, 21 1/2 x 28 1/4 inches

Noah’s Ark, 1979, acrylic, mica and ink on paper, 23 x 17 inches

Calculus of Rhyme, 1987, acrylic, sand and pigment on paper, 18 7/8 x 16 1/2 inches

Cardinal, 1978, oil, isobutyl methacrylate, and eggshell on canvas, 80 x 86 inches

In a Way of Sense, 1977, acrylic, mica, sand and crayon on paper, 19 x 11 1/2 inches

Avec, 1979, mixed media on paper, 19 1/2 x 17 1/4 inches

Willingness, 1977, acrylic, mother of pearl, pastel and Bic pen ink on paper, 16 1/2 x 15 inches

Such That, 1987, mixed media on paper, 11 3/16 x 15 7/8 inches

More So When, 1971, oil, isobutyl methacrylate and mica on linen, 68 x 68 inches

Tethered Ease, 1971, oil and isobutyl methacrylate on canvas, 70 x 72 inches

See What Happens, 1971, gouache on paper, 22 1/2 x 16 1/4 inches

Surface Climate, 1971, gouache and pastel on paper, 21 x 8 1/2 inches

Glistening Drowse, 1970, gouache on paper, 17 1/2 x 15 1/2 inches

How it Starts, 1974, gouache on paper, 17 x 19 3/4 inches

Errand of Honey, 1971, gouache on paper, 20 x 10 inches