Skip to content

Visiting Artist’s Studios

Six gallery artists adjust their practices. 
You’re invited to take a look at some works in-progress and their new ways of life.

Stephen Westfall  John Walker  Tom Uttech  Lois Dodd  Brett Bigbee  Pat Adams

 

Head-Image

Stephen Westfall Text

Stephen Westfall sets-up Upstate, March 2020

Stephen Westfall writes:  I’m upstate at a friend’s house stockpiling the larder, cooking, dealing with far flung family members, learning Zoom, and taking socially distancing walks like everyone else. Fortunately, we have a great view of the Catskills, the cradle of the American painterly imagination. So even as an abstract painter I feel I’m in a good place. Planning to bring supplies up from my Brooklyn studio when the weather warms. It’s a transition, but I have seven watercolor blocks of different sizes and am commencing to add to the work on paper that the gallery will eventually have. 

Stephen is on sabbatical this term from the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers.  Earlier this year his painting Solid Gone was acquired by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art through an Art Purchase Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.  Congratulations, Stephen!

Stephen Westfall Press

But the many variations suggest that Westfall is responding to a wide range of imagery, information, art historical awareness, and, of course, personal impulses. Such associations are not a matter of appropriation but rather, of working within a greatly expanded contemporary visual and semiotic frame of reference. If one of his goals is immediacy of impact, another is a subsequent richness of contemplative experience that motivated spiritualists such as Mondrian and Malevich, and the creators of Eastern mandalas. The work moves between a meditative orientation and everyday, vernacular readings. Westfall’s paintings, while rigorous in visual concept and exacting execution, are idiosyncratically allusive and expressive. His execution of new work within a field of apparent contradictions is a masterful balancing act.

Robert Berlind, 2013

John Walker Text

John Walker Studio, April 2020

John now maintains his primary studio in an old Freemason hall near the water in MidCoast Maine – where the “Bingo Card” paintings began.  The rural setting, already quite isolated, allows John to safely continue the short commute between home and studio each day.  This past winter John enjoyed a homecoming celebration with an exhibition at the Ikon Gallery in his hometown of Birmingham, England.  Also earlier this year, the Phillips Collection in Washington, DC, which has long collected and exhibited John’s work, acquired a recent major painting through the generosity of Cleveland collectors.

John Walker Press

From his meditations on Matisse, Walker brought a summery light, cooler, and harder than Matisse’s Mediterranean light, into his own new pictures. For form he used the wave, blue and white rhythmic bands, as old as any form in western art, and landscape forms, islands, rocks, and the blunt finger of Seal Point became shield-like. At the horizon line a thickly painted island often appears. The paint is raw, viridian, and lavish, a celebration of seeing. It fits Walker’s maxim to himself: “Stop trying to make the paint look like something it isn’t. Goya, Chardin, Vermeer…you know you’re looking at paint. You need the ability to pick up this colored mud and turn it into air.

William Corbett, 2015

Tom Uttech Text

Tom Uttech, March 2020

Tom, Mary and their college-aged son are home, north of Milwaukee.  Their property includes over 30 acres of native tall-grass prairie, which Tom restores, cultivates, seeds, mows and burns.  A great bird-watching environment.  He is planning his summer garden, going on walks, and spending time in the studio.  His beloved “migration” paintings, examples of which are in major American museums including Crystal Bridges, New Orleans and the Smithsonian, are giving way to a new motif – “reflection” paintings.  Two major “reflection” paintings were included in our most recent gallery show, and we look forward to the new ones, two of which are in-progress now. “Symmetry is life, it’s reality.  That is magic.  Painting, hopefully can do that too.”

Tom Uttech Press

“There is a lot of symmetry in life, of one kind or another. One of the neatest things about nature is that it is totally chaotic at all times, while it is simultaneously totally organized. And a lot of that organization has to do with symmetry. Symmetry is life; it’s reality. That is magic. Painting, hopefully, can do that too.

The symmetry of the reflections is a different story. In the far north, twilight lasts a long time. If you paddle at just the right pace on a calm day, you will see in the water a perfect reflection of the real world. This upside-down world exists just like the “real” world, although it’s not actually there. It becomes like a ghost; it seems to complete reality.

If the water is clear, it further complicates and completes the meaning of life. The things we see under the water — fallen trees, submerged plants and fish and such — are real, but they exist in a realm where we humans are denied entrance. So there is a combination of real, unreal, and also unavailable. That is mind altering. I want to generate that in my painting — not describe its appearance. So far I am not totally satisfied with my efforts.”

Adapted from interview with Jennifer Samet for Beer with a Painter, 2017

Lois Dodd Text

Lois Dodd, March 2020

Lois Dodd is well, happy and enjoying her usual routine in New York.  On April 22nd Lois celebrated her 93rd birthday with a Zoom party organized by her two granddaughters.  Her first experience video conferencing.  She no longer goes out, except to her roof for light and air.  The view from her third floor windows look over the old Marble Cemetery, which feels like an open field between her house and the Bowery Hotel.  A familiar subject for Lois over these past fifty years, even before our current confinement indoors.

Lois Dodd Press

These paintings record place, but they also record the act of translating place into paint- the artist’s intervention. Her distinct and fluid brush strokes seem casual at first, but they are precisely and elegantly laid down.

Seeing through to things has been an enduring theme in her painting: what windows frame, how they shape, limit, focus, reflect or do not reflect, depending on whether they retain their glass panes, how they reject or welcome, distort, how they imply choice-to look or not to look. These windows, then, frame Dodd’s views, actual and metaphorical.

Deborah Weisgall, 2003

Bigbee Text

Brett Bigbee, April 2020

For almost thirty years Brett Bigbee has been known for his unique magic precisionist realism that shared qualities with both European Renaissance masters and American folk art. About two years ago he broke from these styles and moved in a direction of intimate surrealist portrayals of his own emotional landscape. The external became internal. We presented a small exhibition of these new paintings that was well received. We look forward to another, larger show, that will include Brett’s exquisite and highly detailed drawings.

Brett Bigbee Press

In the past, my paintings took years to complete. I sought to create works that required exactitude and adhered to the disciplines devised by artists throughout history. These works are contemplative and bring great meaning to me.

However, my life did not follow a predictable path, and my new paintings started to reflect my internal and external conflicts. As a result, where I once almost froze each moment in silence, I began to reveal the forces that shape us all. So here in these first paintings I explore a path toward freedom as a visual storyteller.

Brett Bigbee, 2018

Pat Adams Text

Pat Adams, March 2020

The gallery had planned to present its first exhibition of Pat Adams’s work this spring – paintings and works on paper from the 1970s and 80s, which we plan to re-present in our physical space next season. In the meantime, follow this link to view Pat’s work in our Virtual Viewing Room. Pat is safe in her longtime home in Vermont, where she taught for years at Bennington College.  She is now working small-scale, making collages and enjoying re-visiting old sketchbooks and ideas. She’s taking a break from going out to her primary studio in an old barn, and now working on an ironing board in the kitchen.

Pat Adams Press

One of the most startling things about Ms. Adams’s works is that their flat surfaces, as active, various and sometimes seemingly chaotic as they are, still maintain clockwork precision and clarity. It’s as if we were seeing the stages of growth or the steps of transformation, each accompanied by its gaseous residue or shed skin.

Lance Esplund, 2005

Thumb-Show

Thumb-Show Thumbnails

Stephen Westfall, Unfolding I, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 9 inches

Available

Inquire

Stephen Westfall, Vale I, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 9 inches

Available

Inquire

Stephen Westfall, Lift, 2020, gouache on paper, 16 x 12 inches

Available

Inquire

Stephen Westfall, Vale II, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 9 inches

Available

Inquire

Stephen Westfall, Light Web, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 11 inches

Available

Inquire

John Walker, Brian’s Stacks, 2020, collage on canvas, 84 x 66 inches

Available

Inquire

John Walker, Matilda, 2020, collage on canvas, 84 x 66 inches

Available

Inquire

John Walker, March 2020, III, 2020, charcoal and ink on paper, 51 x 40 inches

Available

Inquire

John Walker, March 2020, IV, 2020, charcoal and ink on paper, 51 x 41 inches

Available

Inquire

John Walker, March 2020 I, 2020, oil on canvas, 60 x 54 inches

Available

Inquire

John Walker, March 2020 II, 2020, oil on canvas, 60 x 54 inches

Available

Inquire

Brett Bigbee, A Desire for Grace, 2020, oil on linen, 7 x 5 inches

Sold

Brett Bigbee, The Orbit of Intimacy, 2019-2020, oil on linen, 8 x 10 inches

Available

Inquire

Brett Bigbee, Toward Dark (in progress), 2019-2020, oil on linen, 14 5/16 x 19 6/16 inches

Available

Inquire

Lois Dodd, 2nd Street View, November, 2016, oil on Masonite, 14 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, February Snowstorm, 2017, oil on Masonite, 17 7/8 x 16 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, West Window View, 2018, oil on Masonite, 20 x 11 3/4 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, View Into the Cove in Moonlight, 2019, oil on Masonite, 10 x 8 inches

Available

Inquire

Lois Dodd, Men's Hotel at Night, 2019, oil on Masonite, 16 x 16 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, January Brook, 1986, oil on Masonite, 12 x 9 7/8 inches

Sold

Pat Adams, Willingness, 1977, acrylic, mother of pearl, pastel and ink on paper, 16 1/2 x 15 inches

Available

Inquire

Pat Adams, How it Starts, 1974, gouache on paper, 17 x 19 3/4 inches

Available

Inquire

Pat Adams, Else, 1979, lithographic ink on macre Japanese paper, acrylic, eggshell, crayon and pastel on paper, 21 1/2 x 28 1/4 inches

Available

Inquire

Pat Adams, Arise, 1981, acrylic, crayon and sand on paper, 23 x 18 3/4 inches

Available

Inquire

Pat Adams, Calculus of Rhyme, 1987, acrylic, sand and pigment on paper, 18 7/8 x 16 1/2 inches

Available

Inquire

Tom Uttech, Onagaskwawai, 2020, oil on linen, 72 x 67 inches including artist's hand painted frame

Sold

Tom Uttech, Nin Nondetibikisitka, 2019-2020, oil on panel, 16 1/4 X 17 1/4 inches including artist's hand painted frame

Sold

Tom Uttech, Obanite, 2020, oil on linen, 40 x 38 inches including artist's hand painted frame

On Reserve

Inquire

Tom Uttech, Nin Nondam, 2019-2020, oil on panel, 15 1/2 X 17 1/4 inches including artist's hand painted frame

Sold

Stephen Westfall, Unfolding I, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 9 inches

Available

Stephen Westfall, Vale I, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 9 inches

Available

Stephen Westfall, Lift, 2020, gouache on paper, 16 x 12 inches

Available

Stephen Westfall, Vale II, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 9 inches

Available

Stephen Westfall, Light Web, 2020, gouache on paper, 12 x 11 inches

Available

John Walker, Brian’s Stacks, 2020, collage on canvas, 84 x 66 inches

Available

John Walker, Matilda, 2020, collage on canvas, 84 x 66 inches

Available

John Walker, March 2020, III, 2020, charcoal and ink on paper, 51 x 40 inches

Available

John Walker, March 2020, IV, 2020, charcoal and ink on paper, 51 x 41 inches

Available

John Walker, March 2020 I, 2020, oil on canvas, 60 x 54 inches

Available

John Walker, March 2020 II, 2020, oil on canvas, 60 x 54 inches

Available

Brett Bigbee, A Desire for Grace, 2020, oil on linen, 7 x 5 inches

Sold

Brett Bigbee, The Orbit of Intimacy, 2019-2020, oil on linen, 8 x 10 inches

Available

Brett Bigbee, Toward Dark (in progress), 2019-2020, oil on linen, 14 5/16 x 19 6/16 inches

Available

Lois Dodd, 2nd Street View, November, 2016, oil on Masonite, 14 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, February Snowstorm, 2017, oil on Masonite, 17 7/8 x 16 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, West Window View, 2018, oil on Masonite, 20 x 11 3/4 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, View Into the Cove in Moonlight, 2019, oil on Masonite, 10 x 8 inches

Available

Lois Dodd, Men's Hotel at Night, 2019, oil on Masonite, 16 x 16 inches

Sold

Lois Dodd, January Brook, 1986, oil on Masonite, 12 x 9 7/8 inches

Sold

Pat Adams, Willingness, 1977, acrylic, mother of pearl, pastel and ink on paper, 16 1/2 x 15 inches

Available

Pat Adams, How it Starts, 1974, gouache on paper, 17 x 19 3/4 inches

Available

Pat Adams, Else, 1979, lithographic ink on macre Japanese paper, acrylic, eggshell, crayon and pastel on paper, 21 1/2 x 28 1/4 inches

Available

Pat Adams, Arise, 1981, acrylic, crayon and sand on paper, 23 x 18 3/4 inches

Available

Pat Adams, Calculus of Rhyme, 1987, acrylic, sand and pigment on paper, 18 7/8 x 16 1/2 inches

Available

Tom Uttech, Onagaskwawai, 2020, oil on linen, 72 x 67 inches including artist's hand painted frame

Sold

Tom Uttech, Nin Nondetibikisitka, 2019-2020, oil on panel, 16 1/4 X 17 1/4 inches including artist's hand painted frame

Sold

Tom Uttech, Obanite, 2020, oil on linen, 40 x 38 inches including artist's hand painted frame

On Reserve

Tom Uttech, Nin Nondam, 2019-2020, oil on panel, 15 1/2 X 17 1/4 inches including artist's hand painted frame

Sold